Chatting To New Generation Producer, Composer, and Beat Maker Tamas


Written by Barbora Krskova

09 May 2019

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Chatting To New Generation Producer, Composer, and Beat Maker Tamas

Music Gateway offers our users a platform to be proactive and explore a wide range of opportunities to collaborate and get their music heard. We like hearing from our members who are out there making it happen, so we caught up with a composer, music producer, and beat maker Tamas, who chatted to us about making music for apps, collaborating with singer-songwriter Matt Jones, and keeping up with the pace of the industry.

Music producer Tamas standing in front of high grass

Could you first tell us a little bit about your background in music and what your role in the industry is?

I am a freelance music producer mainly working on music for apps, ads, and short films. I consider myself one of the new generation of music producers, operating somewhere between a composer, a beatmaker and an old school producer. This means I mainly produce in popular urban genres and styles, but in a commercial approach. I am always aiming to meet industry standards. I have about 12 years of classical music studies behind me with an additional 3 years of Commercial Music (University of Westminster). This, in my opinion, makes up for a good mixture of music theory, culture and music business knowledge.

You recently collaborated with singer-songwriter Matt Jones on tracks ‘Fighter’ and ’Now you’re gone’. How did it go?

I feel really lucky that I found Matt through the platform. I think we are really on the same page in terms of work music and work ethic. Because of that our process is very intense but fast, straightforward, and goal-oriented. We both constantly check for new briefs on MG. We immediately message each other if something comes up that fits our style and capabilities.

I usually send him a draft of the instrumental with the harmonies, the rhythm, and the structure more or less in place. Then he starts to blast out ideas of the vocals immediately. He sends me demos and ideas to change in the instrumental during the process. When we both agree on the vocals, he sends me the recorded vocal tracks and I place them in the mix. Then I send back a demo, and if there are no more adjustments needed, the song is ready. This process can take up days, even weeks, but in case of urgent briefs, we can hit unbelievable speeds. For example ‘Fighter’ took no more than 2 days to complete. Read all about Matt’s experience here!

Have you considered pitching your own projects?

Yes. In some cases, the platform will be very useful in finding the right people for certain projects. I haven’t had the chance to try it yet. It is definitely something I have in mind as a go-to tool in the future.

Music producer Tamas standing in front of a wooden wall

How are you getting on with Music Gateway?

I really enjoy using the platform because you can really tell that there is actually a group of dedicated people behind it. This shows whenever you need any technical help or ask for feedback. Not to mention the content on the blog and free webinars – just like the one Jon Skinner held a couple of months back. What really makes it easy to use is that for each pitch I can select the relevant music from my Audio Library and submit straight away with only a few clicks. It is nice to have all my stuff collected in one platform. So far I managed to get on some playlists sent out to MG clients, but I also got in contact with A&R people of different music libraries.

What projects are you working on at the moment?

So at the moment one of my projects is producing stock music for an upcoming video editing app. Building entire music libraries for exclusive use is a great way of having a steady, long term project. It is also an opportunity to create your own unified sound for entire projects – it’s kind of like leaving your stamp on products/platforms.

Additionally, as someone who makes a living off their music, do you find having multiple sources of income is necessary for success?

I think having multiple sources of income is vital in all creative fields because you never know what tomorrow brings. Everything is changing, especially in the online/digital fields, you have to be ready for whatever is the new trend. Just as music streaming services got us streaming instead of buying albums, video streaming services made it possible for a much larger group of musicians and producers to have their music placed in shows and series. With all these opportunities brought closer to each one of us, we have to be ready to ride the largest waves and stay ahead of the competition. And for that, multiple sources of income is a must.

Close-up view of music producer Tamas wearing sunglasses

What advice would you give someone in a similar position to you or someone trying to achieve what you have?

I think an important skill to have nowadays as a music producer is being well-rounded. To be able to say yes to whatever good opportunity you come across, you must have at least a little bit of knowledge of all popular genres and be a master of as many as you can. This means endless hours of trying out new techniques and listening to music. Also, occasionally trying to produce something completely different from your usual routine. And also never forget to make music just for fun! Usually, the best material comes from sessions without any pressure.

Would you like to branch out and collaborate with creatives across different genres? Or perhaps get your music played in a film?

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