How sync music is the gateway for new artists


Written by Mary Woodcock

04 December 2015

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Synchronisation made its debut in the music industry over 30 years ago when Matthew Broderick lip synced to the Beatles “Twist and Shout” in the 1986 film “Ferris Bueller’s Day off”. With other artists shortly following thereafter including Frank Sinatra, David Bowie and Michael Jackson in the world of synchronisation, it was no surprise to see sync was here to stay.

Sync and helping artists

Sync has helped many new or established artists by creating an awareness of their music. If something is being attached to a product, TV or film, it automatically opens the door for you to be exposed to a wider audience. Besides, the great exposure for Bulmers gives them the opportunity to expand creativity and mix genres in an exciting innovative way. This crosses boundaries and allows further exposure fo underground artists and genres.

 

The opportunities for sync within the music industry

Physical and digital copies of tracks are no longer the focus for artists with the introduction of streaming and downloads. This makes fan loyalty harder than ever before but it also makes it easier for artists to throw themselves into the limelight. Asides from radio play which is hard to break into the next big thing is ‘that song from the advert!’ and companies, especially at this time of year with John Lewis, Coca Cola, Sainsbury’s and more bringing out huge adverts for Christmas, are all over that one off song for people to fall in love with.

Sync is one of the best ways of getting a fee upfront and a performance royalty as well as a guaranteed bonus. Whereas certain major mainstream artists can release music on one platform and can get away with it supplying their monthly income, new artists may not have that privilege up front. It is one of the foundations of the music industry’s revenue today.

The music industry’s main revenue once stood on the shoulders of physical CD sales, however the CD has experienced the most drastic change in recent years. After selling 165 million units in 2013, another 14 percent was deducted a year after that, with only 140.8 million CDS being sold in the year 2014. This shows how sync and gigging is now the main focus for revenue streams.

The future

Sync licenses are difficult to come by but anyone who is able to position themselves correctly within the sync industry will not be let down, the potential revenues are huge. As we strive to connect people within the industry we look out for and receive briefs daily from Music Supervisors across the globe. This means by pitching to a  project of interest you can easily enter into the sync market once the project owner sees your pitch and is interested.

Finally, if you ever find yourself pitching for a sync opportunity remember to make sure your song sounds fresh and exciting. Click here to read advice from our CEO and founder Jon Skinner on the best practice on pitching to music supervisors when it comes to sync. If you’re looking for a sync opportunities click here to see how our Music Gateway community can work for you – Sign up today!


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